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New Article on Ethnicity

Dear Readers,

As we continue working on ethnicity in Indonesia, we have just published a journal article, “Declining Dominance of an Ethnic Group in a Large Multi-Ethnic Developing Country: the Case of the Javanese in Indonesia”, Population Review, volume 55, number 1, 2016, pp. 1-26, written by Aris Ananta, Dwi Retno Wilujeng Wahyu Utama, and Ari Purbowati.

Here is the abstract
Indonesia is undergoing a third demographic transition that features changes in ethnic composition.  We examine quantitatively the extent and change of dominance of the Javanese, who have experienced below replacement fertility.  As used herein, an ethnic group is said to be dominant if it is the largest ethnic group and its percentage is at least twice the percentage of the second largest ethnic group. The Javanese are the largest, most ubiquitous and politically important ethnic group in Indonesia. This quantitative analysis addresses the ethnic dominance and cultural hegemony literature. We question the ubiquity of the Javanese – who represent the process of Javanization – because Indonesia’s Javanese character/culture may be eroding. We find that among the Javanese living outside their three home provinces, the percentage of those who speak Javanese daily at home is very low.  These Javanese may have adapted to local conditions. We also find that the Javanese are not always the dominant or even the largest ethnic group. In most of the districts, they comprise a very small minority ethnic group.

An important finding is that the “third demographic transition” has been and continues to be occurring in Indonesia, a large developing country. Our findings expand the original concept of what constitutes a third demographic transition, which has been applied previously only to developed countries. We conclude that the Javanese are still dominant, but their dominance has declined, and that a third demographic transition is taking place in Indonesia.

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Filed under: Demography, English, Ethnic Diversity, Indonesia, Statistics, Ethnicity, Large Population, statistics, , ,

POWERPOINT ON UNCOVERING INDONESIA’S ETHNIC DIVERSITY: THE NATIONAL, PROVINCIAL, AND DISTRICT LEVELS

6 December 2014

Dear Readers,

Indonesia is a very large country, with at least 600 ethnic groups. Utilizing the availability of statistics on ethnicity from 2010 Indonesia Population Census and the “New Classification of Indonesia’s Ethnic Groups”, Evi Nurvidya Arifin, Aris Ananta, and Dwi Retno Wilujeng Wahyu Utami attempt to uncover Indonesia’s ethnic diversity at the national, provincial, and district Levels. This is an ethno-demographic study, analysing ethnicity (in this case ethnic diversity) using statistics.

Uncovering Indonesia’s Ethnic Diversity is the powerpoint presented in an ISEAS public seminar, Singapore, 18 November 2014.

You may quote this powerpoint.

A short description of the seminar can be seen here.

Best regards,

Aris Ananta

Filed under: Demography, English, statistics, , , , , , , , , ,

Reviews on Indonesia’s Population Ethnicity and Religion in a Changing Political Landscape

Indonesia’s Population: Ethnicity and Religion in a Changing Political Landscape was published in 2003, by the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore.

Graeme Hugo, PhD.,  Professor of Geography, Director, The National Centre for Social Applications of Geographic Information Systems, The University of Adelaide, said:

  • “This is a most interesting book to all students of Indonesian society. It presents data on religion and ethnicity collected in the 2000 Indonesian census in an accessible way. The 2000 census was the first since the colonial Volkstelling of 1930 to collect information on ethnicity. Although Indonesia is one of the worlds most ethnically heterogeneous nations  both the Orde Lama of President Sukarno and Orde Baru of President Suharto eschewed recognition of ethnic groups in the interest of developing national unity. Hence the data examined in this book have been long awaited by many Indonesianists. ” His full review is here.

Sharon Siddique, a partner in a Singapore-based regional consulting firm, mentioned that  the book is “New Light on Indonesia’s Ethnic Makeup”. She further  said

“…This book lays out a feast of data for the thoughtful. It is particularly timely as businessmen, scholars and journalists grapple with the implications of Indonesia’s decentralization policies on provincial-level politics and development dynamics. Certainly ethnicity and religion are issues that require careful consideration. This book is an invaluable reference.” Her full review is here.

Filed under: English, publications, , , , , , , ,

Will Indonesia have a non-Javanese President?

Evi Nurvidya Arifin

Opinion Asia, 20 February 2010

Indonesia has been in transition in more ways than one. For over a decade, it has undergone social, economic and political transformation, portending tremendous change in the country. The island of Java and Javanese have played and will continue to play a pivotal role in this transition. Demographically, the Javanese represent the majority ethnic group comprising about 42% or 99 million out of Indonesia’s 230 million population. By any stretch, this is a huge number.

The Javanese Diaspora through Jakarta’s transmigration policy has provided a framework to understand the Indonesian geopolitical landscape. The transmigration policy of yesteryears was promoted to improve the national poverty profile by sending Javanese Indonesians to outlying islands thus giving them more land to improve their livelihood. The famous Javanese saying Mangan ora mangan pokoke kumpul (literally: eating or not, the most important thing is being together) is thus just a myth as the Javanese are spread throughout Indonesia’s 17,000 islands. In the neighbouring countries of Singapore and Malaysia, the Javanese comprise a significant portion of their Malay population.

From a cultural-political perspective, transmigration has been interpreted by Indonesians outside Java as a process of “Javanization”, Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: English, migration, , , , , , , , ,



This site contains the writings of Aris Ananta & Evi Nurvidya Arifin. Click here to find out more about them.

We are researchers in the field of demography, social and economic statistics, and economics, focusing on Indonesia and Southeast Asia. Click here to find out more about OUR PUBLICATION .<br

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